Tag Archive: nsw


Freebies

I’ve put up some freebies on my webpage, some photos specifically for my Facebook fans. I’ve created a range of cover photos for use on facebook timelines. Feel free to download (instructions are on the link) and share around. Cheers.

http://wawabyjohnah.com/freebies

 

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Sales and a new venture

It’s been a good few weeks in terms of sales of my works. I sold a few stickers on redbubble, which is great. But even more exciting is that I sold two framed photographs locally. I sold Hill End Church


and Autumn by the Lake

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It’s very humbling to know people enjoy my photographs enough to buy them. Thank you very much to the buyers.

I’ve also decided to sell my photography and art at a local market in a couple of months. I’m getting together some more framed prints, some calendars and blank greeting cards to sell, as well as taking along some of my artworks. This will be the first time I’ve had a stall at a fete so will be interesting to see how it goes. If you’re in Orange NSW on Sunday 18 September, be sure to come and say g’day
Have a great day
Johnah

I got some of my favourite photographs printed and framed. They look awesome so I got a few extras done and they are up for sale, direct from the photographer, me! Please have a look through the gallery, click on the image you like and you can see the price. Frame size for all images is 400mmx320mm. If you would like to purchase the photograph, please email me with the name of the photograph at wawabyjohnah@gmail.com and I will send an invoice.


All original photographs. Direct from Photographer. Many more images available. Email me direct for catalogue- wawabyjohnah@gmail.com

Built around 1875, St Patrick’s Catholic Church is quite a sight in the little country town of Boorowa.

This was the first Roman Catholic Church to be built west of the Great Dividing Range. Of particular interest are the church’s excellent stained glass windows and its fine altar which was made from imported Italian marble. (SMH).

With a population of just over 2000 now,  I can only imagine what the town was like when this grand church was built. The whole town could fit in to it now.

Saint Patrick's

A little history of Boorowa– The name Boorowa is said to be an Aboriginal word for a native bird, possibly a bush turkey. The first wave of settlers in the area were “squatters” and Irish ex-convicts. The Irish population grew during the 1840s and 1850s, during the Potato Famine, when many Irish fled their own country. Wool and wheat were the foundation stones of the town’s economy and remain so today. (Visit Young)

Boorowa is also home to the The Irish Woolfest. In October each year, this festival celebrates the town’s heritage. The big drawcard is the Running of the Sheep (Boorowa’s answer to Spain’s Running of the Bulls). There’s also a street parade, Irish singers and dancers, pipe bands and hot air ballooning. (Visit NSW). The town’s population explodes over this weekend.

I went for a leisurely drive out to Byng over the Long Weekend. I had been there many years ago and taken photos, but I must have lost the film, because I don’t ever remember seeing the processed prints.

The drive to Byng was interesting in itself. About a third of the trip was dirt, and a couple of kilometres of this were through a large property/farm. I don’t often drive on roads where cattle are free to wander onto the road- I was driving through their paddock!

Byng ChurchI love old churches and cemeteries. The character and architecture of them is stunning and they hold much of the history of long forgotten villages and towns. I am amazed at how many still stand, even though they are over a hundred years old and rarely used any more. The current Byng Uniting church was built in 1872, to replace the Wesleyan Chapel that was a few hundred metres away. I’m not sure what happened to the Chapel, either it became too small for a bustling village or fell down.

Byng Church

The church stone is an acid volcanic rock known as tuff, produced by the consolidation of volcanic ash and other volcanic fragments found around volcanic openings. It is porous and is not subject to salt attack like sandstone. Tuff is a reasonably common local stone and, from a distance, resembles yellowblock sandstone in appearance (More Byng History).

The church has some interesting features, including some intricate sculptural aspects above the windows. It also includes an outdoor toilet, aka a ‘long drop’, out the back.

The CrossAcross the road from the church is the cemetery. The cemetery contains the graves of many early settlers and their descendants. One of the people burried there is William Tom, the first discoverer of gold in Australia.

Some further information on Byng

Byng, near Orange NSW, was originally named ‘Cornish Village’ after the original Cornish settlers who brought the first fruit trees from Cornwall and gave birth to the Orange district’s fruit industry on the ‘Pendarvis’ property. Apples were produced in Byng for over 100 years but now there are mainly cattle, sheep and a little cropping. At its peak, Byng village had around 600 residents.

The Church and the cemetery are all that remain of the original village.

Websites of interest:

All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without My Permission. My Images Do Not Belong To The Public Domain.
© WaWa by Johnah (Sarah Donoghue)

 

Autumn Snow

Brrr!It snowed here Wednesday night. They say it is a once in seven year event- snow in May. It didn’t snow much in town. A dusting around 1am, but I was tucked up in my nice warm bed at that time. I was forced to get up when one of my cats wanted to go out at around 3am. There was still a little snow on the roof and windscreen but none on the ground.

I decided to head up to Mt Canobolas this morning to see if there was any snow left. The roaad to the summit had been closed the past few days and I hadn’t had a chance to go up there before today anyway. Part way up the fog wrapped in around us and I thought it was actually snowing on. It wasn’t until I got out at the summit that I worked out it wasn’t snow, but ice. It was bitterly cold, with a killer wind. So cold that the drizzle from the previous day had been frozen solid to the trees and grass. That’s what had been falling on the car as I drove up. Lumps of ice. They were even falling, with loud thuds, off the telecomunications towers too. I now know why my television reception has been a bit off over the last few days.

There were icicles everywhere. You could see the direction that the wind was going by the direction of the icicles on the trees, grass and even the picnic tables

It was so cold, I think my hands were starting to get frost bite. It’s very difficult to press a shutter button with gloves on, and I’d left them at home anyway. So after only a few minutes out in the cold, I piked it and got back into the car and turned the heater on full. The car outside themometer said it was 3 degrees outside but the wind chill factor, coming off the ice and snow, would have been at least -5. I haven’t been so cold is a long time. I did get a couple of decent shots, but missed the best of the snow. Hopefully it snows again this year so I can get some better photographs.
Autumn Snow

Thanks for looking. Have the best day ever!
Johnah

The HDR Journey Begins

I finally did it. I purchased Photomatix software to allow me to do some HDR photography. High Dynamic Range photography is the ability to take a series of different exposures of the same scene and combining them in post processing so all the image is properly exposed. It’s closer to what your eye sees, rather than what the camera sees- which is limited.

I had taken shots at Hill End, NSW, Australia that I wanted to turn into HDR images years ago, plus some new ones over the Easter weekend. One of the most famous buildings in Hill End, Beyers Cottage, is my image I started with. I did both a colour and black and white version and love the results. They are below.
Beyers Cottage- B&W

Beyers Cottage- Colour

The bonus of using HDR software for this image- if it was straight from the camera either to get the beautiful sky well exposed would mean that the shadows under the verandah would be dark or vice versa. With HDR software you have the correct exposure for both, producing the fantastic results you see.

Thanks for looking. Have an awesome day!

An old fireplace I discovered many years ago on another photographic expedition. I thought it would look great with star trails so I went to find it again.

It was a bit bright this night- some cloud cover around but I still got a half decent shot. I really like the silhoetted trees in the background. I will head out another time to try this one again. I just hope the people who live on the property behind the fireplace don’t call the police- they did a drive by at 10:30pm to see what I was doing!

The Old Fireplace

Click on the image to be taken to my portfolio. Thanks for looking.

Star Trails

I’ve been away for the Easter weekend with a group of photographers from RedBubble, the main site I put my photography on. We went to the little historic gold mining town of Hill End, Central NSW. It is a great place to photograph. Many old buildings, mining reminents, autumn trees and spectacular lookouts are there, waiting to be shot. Over the weekend, one of the fellows I met offered to take us out to show how to take star trails. Since this is something I have wanted to do, like, forever, I jumped at the chance to go out into the darkness with three pretty much complete strangers! It was pitch black when we arrived at our vantage point, and with one torch between us, it was a little difficult to negotiate our way (it didn’t help that Jeff ran away with the torch and left us standing in the dark). But we found the perfect spot, under the amazing Milky Way. I can’t remember the last time I had seen so many stars. Jeff showed us how to set up the camera, made sure we were pointing due south and we opened our shutters and waited.

Eight minutes into our long exposure, my cameras shutter closed, all on its own, and it didn’t record an image. Damn batteries, or so I assumed. I couldn’t attempt another shot as the moon had risen and there was too much light coming from it, so we all headed back to the Lodge. I was disappointed that my star trail hadn’t worked, but excited to get home and try it again. I did some research and discovered my cameras maximum exposure time is eight minutes, but I also found out about ‘stacking’ photographs to reduce noise in long exposures. This was perfect, as I was sooo annoyed that eight minutes was all I got- now I had unlimited time.

So I packed up my gear, put on a few extra layers- it was around 7 degrees outside, and headed off to find the ideal spot to try star trails again. After driving for a while, up a number of skinny dirt roads, I found a spot away from houses and cars and set up. I tried a few different lengths of exposure, took lots of shots and then headed back home- with the heater on full ball to thaw out. Uploaded the shots onto my computer. Used the stacking software I had downloaded earlier in the day and waited to see the results.

A few did not work out very well, not long enough exposures, a couple had good star trails but my light painting techniques need some work or there wasn’t any foreground at all. But i did have one image I did like. My torch was going flat so the tree in the forground isn’t very bright and half way through one exposure the plane from Sydney came in to land, light blazing right under the tree! But other than that, I am pleased with the result and here it is- In the Still of the Night

Now to buy some long johns and a beanie and head out into the darkness to perfect my star trails. I can’t wait.